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For New Members Only

As of July first, the price for a 2019 membership will be reduced to $8.

 

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California Relay Service (CRS)

The California Relay service for the hearing impaired is provided through the CPUC.

CRS provides the full range of Relay services: TTY, Voice Carry Over (VCO), two-line Voice Carry Over (2LVCO), Hearing Carry Over (HCO), Speech-to-Speech (STS), Visually Assisted Speech-to-Speech (VA STS), ASCII, Voice, and Enhanced Voice Carryover (Captioned Telephone or CapTel). Although not provided through CRS, Internet Protocol Relay (IP Relay), Video Relay Services (VRS), and Web CapTel are also available as free, federally reimbursed services.

You can always reach CRS providers toll free.

The CA Relay website lists the most up to date telephone numbers.

On the website, you can set up your Customer Profile, to let CRS know exactly how you want your calls handled.

Your options include:

  • Language
  • Modality
  • Gender of Communications Assistant (CA)
  • Speed Dial of frequently called numbers
  • Long Distance Carrier
  • Slow Typing
  • Customized Greetings/Messages

NEW Computer Assistance Drop-In With Bill Hammond

Starting September 11, 2019
Wednesdays 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Multipurpose Room

  • Drop in tech support for Windows computers
  • Have your questions about software answered
  • Solve performance issues
  • Receive upgrade recommendations
  • Troubleshoot problems – please bring your laptop
  • Get advice on maintenance

Services provided by Bill Hammond a retired computer engineer.

 

Calendar for the Week of August 18, 2019

Day Time Event Location
Monday 9:30 am Advisory Board Meeting Lounge
Monday 5:00 pm Wine ‘n Dine, Lazy Dog reservations required
Tuesday 8:15 am Walking Buddies – beginner Lobby
Tuesday 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Investment Discussion Group Lounge
Wednesday 9:00 am – 11:30 am Care Management appointment required
Thursday 8:15 am Walking Buddies – advanced Lobby

This calendar publishes the activities that change from week to week. See the Weekly Activity page for weekly activities, and the newsletter for more details on activities.

Some activities for Walnut Creek Seniors Club members only. Membership open to everyone 50 or better.

Advisory Board Minutes for June 17, 2019

Walnut Creek Seniors Club
Advisory Board Meeting
June 17, 2019

 

The meeting was called to order at 9:30 am by President Annette Hammond.

 

Present: Annette Hammond, Jody Johnson, Bob Mohler, Cindy Mohler, Kent Clancy, Mark Pitzlin, Barbara Bacon, Fred Rentschler, Jeanne Wolf.  Also in attendance were Kat Reisinger, Carolyn Jackson, Vannessa Cendejas (staff) and Fred Weston from PROS.

Read more…

Newsletter – August 2019

Having problems finding  the newsletter online?  Well it’s on the City of Walnut Creek’s web page for 50+.  As this is an extremely large file, I don’t see any reason to duplicate it. There is a link for the city’s “Adults 50+” site on the right side of every web page.  It’s under the Section “Seniors“.  Look for the link titled “Walnut Creek Seniors City Site“.   When you go to this page, just click on the link for the month you want under “Check Out Our Newsletters“.

To make it even easier, here is the link for the August 2019 Newsletter.  The city will take this newsletter down in about two months, so if you want a permanent copy, download and save it.

Calendar for the Week of August 11, 2019

Day Time Event Location
Monday 9:00 am – 11:00 am Coffee & Conversations Multipurpose Room
Monday 1:00 pm ScreenTime, Peet Segar, The Power of Song Lounge
Tuesday 8:15 am Walking Buddies – beginner Lobby
Tuesday 10:30 am – 12:00 pm Market Day Outdoor Plaza
Tuesday 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Petanque! (French Bocce Ball) Back Patio
Wednesday 12:30 pm – 3:30 pm HICAP Counseling appointment required
Thursday 8:15 am Walking Buddies – advanced Lobby
Friday 10:00 am – 12:00 pm Grandparents Day at the Pool Larkey Park Splash Pad

This calendar publishes the activities that change from week to week. See the Weekly Activity page for weekly activities, and the newsletter for more details on activities.

Some activities for Walnut Creek Seniors Club members only. Membership open to everyone 50 or better.

Trivia Fact for August 2019

Brought to you by Trivia Fan-atics

Ask anyone to name the greatest zeppelin disaster, and they will immediately think of the Hindenburg. The LZ 129 Hindenburg flew from March 1936 until it was destroyed by fire 14 months later on May 6, 1937, while landing at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Manchester Township, New Jersey.  There were 36 fatalities. This was the last of the great airship disasters; it was preceded by the crashes of the British R38 in 1921 (44 dead), the US airship Roma in 1922 (34 dead), the French Dixmude in 1923 (52 dead), the British R101 in 1930 (48 dead), and the USS Akron in 1933 (73 dead).  Only the Roma had fewer fatalities.

 

So why was the Hindenburg using hydrogen instead of helium?

Helium was initially selected for the lifting gas because it was the safest for airships, as it is not flammable. At the time, however, helium was relatively rare and extremely expensive, as the gas was only available as a byproduct of mined natural gas reserves found in the United States Because of its expense and rarity, American rigid airships using helium were forced to conserve the gas and this hampered their operation. Hydrogen, by comparison, could be cheaply produced by any industrialized nation and being lighter than helium also provided more lift.

Despite a U.S. ban on the export of helium under the Helium Control Act of 1927, the Germans designed the Hindenburg to use the far safer gas in the belief that they could convince the US government to license its export. When the National Munitions Control Board refused to lift the export ban, the designers were forced to re-engineer the Hindenburg to use hydrogen. Despite the danger of using flammable hydrogen, no alternative gas could be produced in adequate quantities. The German’s long history of flying hydrogen-filled passenger airships without a single injury or fatality created a widely held belief that they had mastered the safe use of hydrogen.